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mert & marcus' photo lighting for dsquared on guess the lighting blog

ted sabarese photo lighting diagram of mert & marcus on guess the lighting blog

copyright, Mert & Marcus.

This image from Dsquared2’s “Aseptic Chic” fall/winter 2010 ad campaign is actually relatively tame compared to the others. The dark and haunting sexiness juxtaposes quite nicely with the sterile, glassed and coolly-lit environment. It’s hot, in a this-may-give-you-nightmares kind of way. And I wouldn’t expect any less from M&M (or D&D, for that matter) who shot this with seven lights.

Camera: Hasselblad 553 ELX with Phase One P45+ digital back and 80mm lens, handheld 11 feet back. Shot at 1/125, f11, ISO 100.

Lighting: Our foreground model on display is lit with a 7-inch grid reflector and 30 degree grid at f11 ½ (+ ½ stop), boomed directly overhead and aimed down at her face. A white beauty dish with diffusion and a full CT blue gel at f8 (- 1 stop) is also boomed high overhead and slightly behind the model. This creates the cool highlights on her hair and on the display box. The background model is lit similarly. A 7-inch grid reflector and 30 degree grid at f11 is boomed overhead (the ½ stop less light focuses our attention to the foreground). Another white beauty dish with diffusion and a full CT blue gel at f8 (-1 stop) is boomed high and slightly behind her. A medium, gridded softbox with full CT blue gel at f5.6 ½ (-1 ½ stops) is positioned eight feet to camera right, eight feet high and almost parallel to our male model.  A medium, white umbrella with a full CT orange gel at f5.6 (-2 stops) is set ten feet to camera left and slightly behind him. This adds just a hint of warmth to his back. An octabank at f2.8 1/2 (-3.5 stops) is behind camera and serves as fill to keep things from going completely black.

Comments: Sticklers for realism, M&M had the glass cases constructed around the models so they would truly feel on-display. The prop stylist forgot to include air vents, though, in his minimalist design. He only realized the oversight when one model began to show early signs of asphyxiation. Luckily, the naked man was an off-duty fireman and broke through the glass with a nearby c-stand. Everyone was okay and, although most on-set wanted to hug him for his bravery, they merely gave the thumbs up.

mert & marcus' photo lighting interview mag for guess the lighting

ted sabarese photo lighting diagram diane kruger on guess the lighting blog

copyright, Mert & Marcus.

This shot from the September 2009 issue of Interview Magazine mixes the provocative fashion of Eyes Wide Shut with German military regalia. Like only M&M can do. It was created with 4 lights.

*Special thanks to Alex MacPherson for the suggestion.

Camera: Hasselblad 553 ELX with Phase One P45 digital back and 80mm lens, handheld 10 feet back. Shot at 1/125, f8, ISO 100.

Lighting: Since this image relies more on shadow than light, the key is actually a silver umbrella at f16 (+2 stops) to camera left of Diane and slightly behind her. A large Octabank at f2.8 1/2 (-2.5 stops) behind camera serves as overall fill. Two small strip lights, both at f8, are behind Diane to the left and right. These are aimed down at the floor and provide some separation from the rear wall.

Comments: Fresh off the Inglourious Basterds set as Bridget von Hammersmark, Diane was constantly pressed for some good Tarantino gossip. She wouldn’t tell anyone about Quentin’s love life or if they got together while shooting, but she did finally find out what was in that briefcase in Pulp Fiction. Apparently after drinking one too many black russians, Quentin confessed that the golden glow wasn’t Marcellus’ soul or anything deep like that; but, an Oscar statue he assumed he’d win later that year.

david drebin's photo lighting in room with a view on guess the lighting blog

ted sabarese photo lighting diagram of david drebin on guess the lighting blog

copyright, David Drebin.

This striking and filmic still is from David’s book Room with a View (inspired from the eponymous Conde Nast Traveler column). It was taken in the NY Standard Hotel, 12th floor, and created with 2 lights.

Camera: Canon 5d Mark II with a 28mm lens, set on a tripod 8 feet back. Shot at 1/125, f8, ISO 100.

Lighting: The key light is a white beauty dish with grid at f8 1/2 positioned high and out of frame to camera left (up against the window). Another white beauty dish with grid at f4 is placed high and out of frame to camera right (also up against the window and aimed almost straight down). The background is a separate plate shot without strobes at 1/2 second, f8 then composited together in photoshop.

Comments: The model received special “hazard” pay because this was shot while the Standard was still under construction. The glass window panes had not been installed yet. The casting specs for this project read, “blond, around 30, not afraid of heights. And preferably without suicidal tendencies.”

*SPOILER ALERT* Don’t read any further if you’d still like to try to guess who the two photographers are. If you have already guessed or have no idea what I’m talking about, read on.

 

terry richardson meat skirt lady gaga

ted sabarese photo lighting diagram of terry richardson lady gaga meat skirt on guess the lighting

ted sabarese photo lighting diagram of hunger pains on guess the lighting

copyrights, Terry Richardson (left), Ted Sabarese (right)

So there you have it. Terry shot the meat Gaga and I shot the meat skirt with potato skin top. But how?

GAGA: This Japan Vogue cover inspired the Lady’s full-on beef evening gown at the MTV Music Awards. Terry created it with one, on-camera speedlight.

Camera: Nikon D3x with 50mm lens, handheld. Shot at 1/60, f5.6, ISO 100.

Lighting: One on-camera flash. Lots of assistants watching.

Comments: The meat dress was originally more filled out, but Lady Gaga snacked on the mid-section when craft services ran out of Goobers.

MEAT SKIRT: This image from my “Hunger Pains” series is one of five outfits representing a meal that the model was craving. It was created with two lights. And this isn’t a guess.

Camera: Hasselblad H1 with 80mm lens and Leaf Aptus 75 back, set on a tripod 12 feet back.

Lighting: The key light is a gridded, white beauty dish at f11 six feet to camera left and eight feet high. The fill light is a large strip bank at f4 1/2 (-2 1/2 stops) with the bottom half flagged to keep the focus on the model’s face. It’s set six feet to camera right and slightly in front.

Comments: Watch the behind-the-scenes video.

Antoine Verglas' photo lighting of angelina jolie on guess the lighting blog

ted sabarese photo lighting diagram of angeline jolie on guess the lighting blog

copyright, Antoine Verglas.

Pre Brad. Pre mother of 37 children. This 2000 portrait of Angelina for British GQ was created with 3 lights. Soft lights.

Camera: Pentax 67 with 90mm lens and Kodak Portra 100 negative film, set on a tripod 8 feet back. Shot at 1/30, f5.6, ISO 100. The image was color, then scanned and converted to b&w.

Lighting: The key light is a large octabank at f5.6 boomed directly over camera and angled slightly downward. The two large soft boxes at f11 (+2 stops) positioned behind the frame with a full silk create the softly glowing, white background and also add the highlights on Angelina’s cheeks and torso.

Comments: Angelina flew herself to the shoot in a Cirrus SR-22 single piston engine aircraft, which she ejected from and let crash into the ocean. While parachuting toward the studio, she changed into wardrobe, applied makeup and curled her hair. She then cut the chute, shattered through an oversized skylight, landed upright, brushed off any stray chards of glass, winked to Antoine and said, “let’s do this bitch, Ant.”

Guess the “meat couture”

September 20, 2010 — 7 Comments

This is a slight departure from the norm, but hey, it’s Monday. Try to guess who shot these two outfits made from fresh, USDA prime cuts of beef. First one to post the correct answers wins total consciousness, on their deathbeds. Which is nice.

And which adornment looks the meatiest of the two? Ready. Go.

We can talk about lighting at a later date.

terry richardson photo lighting for lady gaga on guess the lighting

ted sabarese photo lighting of meat skirt on guess the lighting blog

 

steven klein's photo lighting for amber valletta on guess the lighting blog

ted sabarese photo lighting diagram of amber valletta on guess the lighting blog

copyright, Steven Klein.

Steven Klein’s work usually tends toward the dark – from his lighting to his provocative narratives. This image of a caged Amber Valletta wearing, i believe, a horse bridle (and isn’t that a mountain lion I see directly behind her?) was created with 3 lights.

To get a better look at the pic, click here.

Camera: Canon Powershot G10, handheld 8 feet back. Shot at 1/125, f5.6, ISO 200.

Lighting: The key light is a white beauty dish at f5.6 with a red gel seven feet to camera right. Another white beauty dish at f4 1/2 (- .5 stops) is four feet directly above camera, serving as the fill and helping amber’s skin to not look completely demonic. A standard reflector at f8 (+1 stop) is positioned high, out of frame to camera left (outside the fence), ten feet behind Amber.

Comments: Though Ms. Valletta is not afraid of oversized cats, she is allergic to them. Next to the M&Ms, Twizzlers and Cool Ranch Doritos, the person in charge of craft services had an assortment of antihistamines. The mountain lion, conversely, was allergic to sugar and went into anaphylactic shock when the third assistant unknowingly tossed him a Lifesaver.

aorta's photo lighting for 125 magazine on guess the lighting blog

ted sabarese photo lighting diagram of aorta on guess the lighting blog

copyright, Aorta

This cinematic and heroic image for the cover 125 magazine was created with 5 lights. FYI, Aorta is Swedish duo Marco Grizelj and Kristian Krän.

Camera: Hasselbad H2 with 80mm lens and Phase One P30+ digital back, set on a tripod twelve feet back. Shot at 1/125, f11, ISO 100.

Lighting: The key light is a silver beauty dish at f11, seven feet to camera left and angled down. Another silver beauty dish (for fill, if you can call it that here) at f8 is set seven feet to camera right and angled down. A 30 degree grid reflector at f11 is positioned behind the door out of frame to the left. This creates the punchy light on the kneeling woman’s face and arm. An Elinchrom spot reflector at f11 positioned outside the glass doors shoots in. A normal reflector at f16 is boomed high above the main model and slightly behind her and to camera right. This gives the strong highlights on her hair.

Comments: Team Aorta likes to give the talent intricate back stories to help shape the cinematic tenor of the image. For this shot, our hero woman’s husband smashed one of her favorite Norman Rockwell collector plates when she told him he couldn’t participate in fantasy football. She’s deciding between keying his cherry red 1967 Mercedes 250SL or divorce. Her mother, on the floor, is relieved because she had accidentally chipped the plate earlier this month and glued it back together. Now she will not be caught and disinvited from any future Thanksgiving dinners.

steven meisel's photo lighting for vogue on guess the lighting blog

ted sabarese photo lighting diagram of steven meisel on guess the lighting

copyright, Steven Meisel

Part of a bigger fashion story, this visually decadent shot for Italian Vogue was made with 2 lights.

Camera: Hasselblad H2 with 80mm lens and Phase One P45 digital back, set on tripod secured to a cherry picker 12 feet above the model. Shot at 1/125, f8, ISO 100.

Lighting: The key light is an Elinchrom Octabank at f8 boomed six feet above the model and slightly behind her. The fill light is a medium strip light at f5.6 positioned horizontally six feet to camera right. The overall effect is relatively flat, but glamorous. The draped fabric looks as good as the model.

Comments: Steven and the crew played six card cribbage while a frustrated tattoo artist painted the model’s body with a brush instead of an electric needle. The set was closed on all sides and guarded by Doberman Pinschers.

david lachapelle's photo lighting of lady gaga on guess the lighting blog

ted sabarese photo lighting diagram of lady gaga on guess the lighting blog

copyright, David LaChapelle

Lady Gaga covered in bubbles shot for the cover of Rolling Stone. Very pink, very LaChapelle and created with 7 light sources.

Camera: Mamiya AFD3 with 80mm lens and Phase One P65+ digital back, hand-held, ten feet back. Shot at 1/60, f8, ISO 100.

Lighting: The somewhat flat, frontal light is created with a large soft box at f8 five feet directly above camera and angled down. A medium strip bank at f5.6 resting on the the floor in front of the camera and angled up provides the fill. Two, bare Kino bulbs are staggered to the Lady’s immediate left and another two to her right. A magnum reflector with diffusion at f16.5 is positioned low in the doorway pointing toward her back (this creates the glowing hair and bubbles and adds some nice, softening lens flare).

Comments: Unsure whether Lady Gaga would enjoy or loathe listening to her own music while shooting, La Chapelle made the smart decision to hire a bagpiper from bagpiper.com. He played all the traditional favorites. The floating bubbles were hand-blown by two non-smoking assistants. After the shoot, Lady Gaga left the studio wearing the bubble outfit (she wanted to show her book club) where she was, ironically, photographed by a pack of paparazzo.